$1.4 billion in refunds waiting for non-filers

Advice

In a tax season when many have complained about diminished or disappearing refunds, the Internal Revenue Season announced Wednesday that unclaimed income tax refunds totaling almost $1.4 billion may be waiting for an estimated 1.2 million taxpayers who did not file a 1040 for 2015.

The IRS estimates the midpoint for the potential refunds for 2015 is $879.

To collect, these taxpayers must file their 2015 federal returns no later than this year’s tax deadline, April 15. Taxpayers in Maine and Massachusetts have until April 17.

“Students, part-time workers and many others may have overlooked filing for 2015,” said IRS Commissioner Charles Rettig in a statement.

Taxpayers seeking a 2015 tax refund may have their checks held if they have not filed tax returns for 2016 and 2017. In addition, the refund will be applied to any amounts still owed to the IRS or a state tax agency, and may be used to offset unpaid child support or past due federal debts, such as student loans.

State-by-state estimates of individuals who may be due 2015 income tax refunds

State or district Estimated no. of individuals Median potential refund Total potential refunds*
Arizona 27,300 $780 $29,486,000
Arkansas 11,200 $824 $12,000,000
California 111,200 $832 $124,397,000
Colorado 23,500 $824 $26,173,000
Connecticut 12,700 $952 $15,981,000
Delaware 4,800 $886 $5,570,000
District of Columbia 3,400 $918 $4,219,000
Florida 84,000 $887 $95,697,000
Georgia 41,100 $799 $44,754,000
Hawaii 7,000 $935 $8,523,000
Idaho 5,200 $712 $5,209,000
Illinois 45,800 $924 $54,804,000
Indiana 26,900 $895 $30,670,000
Iowa 12,300 $913 $13,737,000
Kansas 12,700 $874 $14,283,000
Kentucky 15,700 $874 $17,246,000
Louisiana 22,600 $884 $26,759,000
Maine 4,700 $806 $4,820,000
Maryland 25,700 $897 $31,274,000
Massachusetts 26,100 $973 $32,579,000
Michigan 39,700 $873 $45,535,000
Minnesota 18,000 $813 $19,222,000
Mississippi 11,200 $814 $12,032,000
Missouri 27,000 $825 $29,008,000
Montana 4,100 $831 $4,521,000
Nebraska 6,300 $870 $6,923,000
Nevada 13,700 $867 $15,728,000
New Hampshire 5,500 $976 $6,859,000
New Jersey 33,100 $960 $41,353,000
New Mexico 8,600 $860 $9,950,000
New York 62,500 $964 $77,662,000
North Carolina 37,100 $831 $39,955,000
North Dakota 3,700 $980 $4,493,000
Ohio 43,600 $852 $47,428,000
Oklahoma 19,100 $886 $22,006,000
Oregon 17,900 $779 $19,118,000
Pennsylvania 46,000 $934 $53,541,000
Rhode Island 3,300 $949 $4,025,000
South Carolina 14,600 $777 $15,701,000
South Dakota 3,300 $928 $3,646,000
Tennessee 24,000 $853 $25,976,000
Texas 129,300 $929 $158,244,000
Utah 9,300 $791 $9,859,000
Vermont 2,200 $876 $2,388,000
Virginia 32,900 $867 $38,441,000
Washington 32,400 $939 $40,142,000
West Virginia 5,900 $948 $6,979,000
Wisconsin 16,100 $787 $16,532,000
Wyoming 3,300 $958 $3,964,000
Totals 1,197,600 $879 $1,379,412,000

*Excluding credits


Jeff Stimpson

Jeff Stimpson

Jeff Stimpson is a veteran freelance journalist who previously served as editor of The Practical Accountant.

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